Wednesday, March 18, 2015

Cuts like a knife!

Appliance cookbooks are pretty common. I've featured them for blenders, pressure cookers, slow cookers, even ovens and refrigerators. Today's sponsor is much more basic than that. Today we'll look at recipes from Cutco Cook Book: World's Finest Cutlery (1956).


I'd expect a book like this to really go crazy with the instructions to chop things up-- dicing, mincing, julienning... maybe even "fancy" ingredients like mango. Mix things up a bit. Make kitchen knives sexy. Cutco took a very practical approach, though.


There's hardly any cutting at all in this recipe, and it doesn't make a big deal out of the fact that the onion, pimento, and pepper should be minced. It's certainly not the hard sell!

The recipe sounds fine, if the title is a bit misleading. The meat loaf is on the bottom and the "stuffing" just sits on top. It's more of a layered meat loaf than a stuffed one, but it sounds perfectly serviceable. (Maybe even yummy if you grate the yellow cheese over the potatoes per the variation! I'm a sucker for cheese.)

The all-in-one meal is pretty popular in this book:

I was trying to figure out what makes this a "bride's dinner," but I guess it's the fact that everything is together so there is no messing with various courses: dressing ball, pork chop, sweet potato, baked apple. It's all together in one cloyingly sweet pan the "bride" can set on the table and be done with. Again, not a lot of cutting involved, and Cutco doesn't bother to try to make it sound as if coring an apple or paring a potato will be a real adventure with a genuine Cutco knife.

I love the '50s single-color illustrations:


Here, the Weiner Twins revel in their good fortune that they're allowed to hold such a long sausage rope without the illustrator (Frank Marcello) adding a Scotty dog to try to steal it. They're so glad that they have failed to note he dressed them in sad school uniforms. Nice beanie!

What might they make with their bounty?


Why, 20th Century Weiners, of course! I'm not sure what makes sliced tomatoes, onions, and hot dogs topped with cheese "20th century," but at least this recipe features slicing a little more prominently....

Happy Cookbook Wednesday, and a big thanks to Louise at Months of Edible Celebrations for hosting!

7 comments:

  1. Don't you just love the illustrations in this book, Poppy. What they missed in cutting and slicing, they made up for in retro images:) (although at the time there was nothing retro about them:)

    That Bride's Dinner cracks me up and those 20th Century Weiners are nothing short of out of this world!!!

    Thank you once again for joining us for Cookbook Wednesday. I have to say, Poppy when I posted those ham rolls I did think of you. In a good way of course, lol...I'll be pinning one of these "glamorous" meals...

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    1. I will have to include more of the images in another post! This book is full of fun "retro" art. I guess I'm honored (?) that when you see banana ham roll-ups, you think of me! ;-)

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    2. Lol, in a good way of course, Poppy. I actually have that book aroundhere somewhere. It's probably in the shed which is just about clear of snow, finally!!!

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  2. Ah, so many cute illustrations! I feel so sorry for that happy little piggy, he's about to be turned into a bride's dinner

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    1. At least it looks like he was free-range.

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  3. I always keep the recipe booklets from all of my appliances, but I've never seen one for knives. The artwork is pretty funny. You always present such a humorous take on your cookbooks!

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    1. It seems pretty odd to have a recipe booklet for knives. I can see how someone might need to be sold on a pressure cooker or a blender, but it's not really hard to know what to do with a knife.

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